New Year, New Training Programme.


Now that my shoulders are finally on the mend it’s time to get back into some serious training. Big competition in the Autumn and a warm up comp in May. So plenty of work to be done.

My sport (like all combat sports) requires a lot of stamina. With bout typically lasting 6 mins I need a both a highly developed aerobic and anaerobic pathway and localised muscular endurance. And with no weight categories I also need considerable strength in order to complete with opponents 15 stone plus.

Macro programme for the year looks like this.

Jan: Base cardio and strength

Feb: Base cardio and strength

March * April: 8 weeks out programme, focus on anaerobic conditioning and muscular speed and endurance.

Late April/Early May: Taper and comp

Late May: Break (light cardio & maintenance strength work)

June & July: 8 weeks out programme, focus on anaerobic conditioning and muscular speed and endurance.

Early August: Taper and comp

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A Kinetic Chain Approach for Shoulder Rehabilitation


John McMullen, MS, ATC* and Timothy L. Uhl, PhD, ATC, PT
Lexington Sports Medicine Center, Lexington, KY
University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Abstract
Objective:

To introduce an approach to shoulder rehabilitation that integrates the kinetic chain throughout the rehabilitation program while providing the theoretical rationale for this program.

Background:

The focus of a typical rehabilitation program is to identify and treat the involved structures. However, in activities of sport and daily life, the body does not operate in isolated segments but rather works as a dynamic unit. Recently, rehabilitation programs have emphasized closed kinetic chain exercises, core-stabilization exercises, and functional programs. These components are implemented as distinct entities and are used toward the end of the rehabilitation program.

Description:

Kinetic chain shoulder rehabilitation incorporates the kinetic link biomechanical model and proximal-to-distal motor-activation patterns with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and closed kinetic chain exercise techniques. This approach focuses on movement patterns rather than isolated muscle exercises. Patterns sequentially use the leg, trunk, and scapular musculature to activate weakened shoulder musculature, gain active range of motion, and increase strength. The paradigm of kinetic chain shoulder rehabilitation suggests that functional movement patterns and closed kinetic chain exercises should be incorporated throughout the rehabilitation process.



Gluten causes intestinal damage in celiac and non-celiacs.


I’ve long thought that just Gluten may be causing damage in everyone, it’s just that in many case the damage may be below the level that can be detected clinically. Until of course it’s too late. This new study published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology would seem to agree.

Abstract:

Objective. Little is known about the interaction of gliadin with intestinal epithelial cells and the mechanism(s) through which gliadin crosses the intestinal epithelial barrier. We investigated whether gliadin has any immediate effect on zonulin release and signaling. Material and methods. Both ex vivo human small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to gliadin, and zonulin release and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in the presence and absence of zonulin antagonism. Zonulin binding, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Tight junction occludin and ZO-1 gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results. When exposed to gliadin, zonulin receptor-positive IEC6 and Caco2 cells released zonulin in the cell medium with subsequent zonulin binding to the cell surface, rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, loss of occludin-ZO1 protein–protein interaction, and increased monolayer permeability. Pretreatment with the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 blocked these changes without affecting zonulin release. When exposed to luminal gliadin, intestinal biopsies from celiac patients in remission expressed a sustained luminal zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability that was blocked by FZI/0 pretreatment. Conversely, biopsies from non-celiac patients demonstrated a limited, transient zonulin release which was paralleled by an increase in intestinal permeability that never reached the level of permeability seen in celiac disease (CD) tissues. Chronic gliadin exposure caused down-regulation of both ZO-1 and occludin gene expression. Conclusions. Based on our results, we concluded that gliadin activates zonulin signaling irrespective of the genetic expression of autoimmunity, leading to increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules.

Read the full report here.


Stress hormone heart death link


High levels of the stress hormone cortisol are closely linked to death from cardiovascular disease, a Dutch study suggests. In a six-year study of 860 over-65s, those with the highest levels of cortisol had a five-fold risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

Read the full article here.


Body composition


Following on from my recent post on BMI. Here is just about the best online body composition tool I have seen, giving; BMI, Waist/Height Ratio, BMR, %BF, Surface Area, and Willoughby Ideal Weight and Waist. Check it out.


Arthroscopic Posterior Capsule Release


Operation number three on the left shoulder took place last Saturday. And the results are so far good with an increase in the range of motion.

The op was necessary because  now (nine months after the first operation) progress and finally ground to a halt, with range of motion limited because of Posterior Capsular Contracture. This paper by H. Gregory Bach, MD and Benjamin A. Goldberg, MD is a very good and through explanation of the procedure.


What’s your BMI and should you care?


I was reading a post over on Art De Vany’s site this morning about body mass index (BMI), so I thought I would check my own. I used the online tool on the NHS website.

Here’s what the NHS says about BMI

BMI is good way to check if you’re a healthy weight. Use our BMI calculator to check the whole family and find helpful information and advice. BMI is a measure of whether you’re a healthy weight for your height.

Here’s my result. Apparently I’m right at the top end of overweight, with a BMI of 28.1.

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